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Wool Doublets

I have 2 wool Doublets, a Red one, and a Purple one.

The red one I made in the fall of 2003. It is red fulled wool, lined with a linen blend quilted behind a silk dupioni (see photos of lining and my teacup poodle, Bella). The pearl buttons are attached by elastic eyes down the center front that just meets. The neck, armhole and waist are bound with silk satin ribbon.

Exerpts from my 2003 Dress Diary:

If you’ve seen my Elizabethan Dress Diary, you know the reason I did a front closing bodice with no side or back seams was because of the conjectured pattern piece from Patterns of Fashion by Janet Arnold. I thought about it and wondered, “Well, if they can do it for dress bodices, why not for doublets?” I’m not the only one who thought of it that way, because I found a reference to the possibility of that very same thing in Janet Arnold’s Queen Elizabeth’s Wardrobe Unlock’d. Eureka!

I made a muslin of the doublet, just estimating where I needed to have things, and draped it on myself. I looked pretty darn silly. I got it to the point where I thought it looked pretty good, and that’s where it stayed for a few months after I got laid off from my job. But then when I got my new job at Haberman Fabrics, I found this really nice red wool coating. I bought it and washed it thoroughly and it felted up nicely. I then cut out the piece of the doublet from it. I then sewed up the shoulders, and had a heck of a time trying to fit it to myself. Mom to the rescue! She pinned it up the front and helped me fit the shoulders better, not to mention put me in my corset properly before doing all of that.

My little dog can pick out the most expensive fabric in a room. That’s where she always goes to sit. I had 3 piles of fabric, silk, linen and wool. So first she goes and sits on the silk… and no matter how many times I try to chase her off, she keeps going back to it. Then I pick it up and put it away, so then she goes to the wool, after I pick that up, she goes to the linen, and then after I pick that up she skips the pile of cotton I had out for another project and goes and sits in her bed which is made from some nice upholstery remnants from work.

I’ve quilted the lining. Thanks to Evelyn who gave me the idea from her jacket (which she used every stitch on every machine at Universal Sewing Center) which turned out very cool, I used all the different stitches on my sewing machine. Which is about 8.

Now I’m not sure if I was just tired, or if the quilting made the lining smaller, but it doesn’t seem to fit the wool shell now.

I also picked up some button looping from work, but I forgot and put them directly on the lining, and now I’m going to have fun trying to put the wool onto that…

As you can see from the photos, it took less than 5 minutes for Bella to find out that silk was reachable, and she had to go and sit on it. That’s a silk noil bow she has on, so she can wear her very own silk. I took these pictures of the interlining to better illustrate the quilting.

I trimmed up the shoulders and re-attached the epaulets, then I went through and started binding all the edges with silk ribbon, using silk thread. There are more than 20 little pearl buttons and I the button holes are actually elastic bridal button hole tape. I need to do it differently, but I’m not sure how yet. I wore it at the end of the Golden Seamstress event.

FYI, Bella passed in December of 2012. She ALWAYS sat on the most expensive fabric, even if it was completely beaded and uncomfortable.
Lining 1 Lining 2 and Bella Lining 3 and Bella

momNme4Trish1 Trish3

The purple one was made in 2010, and is unlined fulled wool with an overlapping center front with antiqued brass buttons. All the edges are bound with black silk satin ribbon. It is mostly hand sewn.

2010-04-25 14.58.04


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